Repairing a damaged cigar with pectin

Tips & Tricks9 Comments on Repairing a damaged cigar with pectin

Repairing a damaged cigar with pectin

Repairing a damaged cigar with pectinHave you ever found yourself with a damaged cigar that you were just dieing to smoke? On occasion we receive cigars in the mail, or as gifts, and sometimes they get to us a little banged up. Occasionally this abuse leads to a pealing wrapper, or and in some cases, a couple of small cracks.

With a little patience and a box of pectin this problems can be quickly remedied to make that banged up cigar smokable.

What you will need:

  1. 1 Box 100% Natural Pectin (Found in the canning isle of your local grocery store)
  2. Small Container of some sorts (such as the lid to a soda bottle)
  3. Small amount of water
  4. 1 Toothpick
  5. Small amount of donor tobacco to use a patch

Directions:

  1. Place a small amount of warm water into your soda bottle cap
  2. Add in a small amount of pectin and stir with toothpick
  3. Apply pectin with toothpick to both the cigar and donor tobacco
  4. Apply patch, press firmly and remove any wrinkles
  5. Allow pectin to dry for about one minute then enjoy your repaired cigar
enjoying cigars since 2005

9 thoughts on “Repairing a damaged cigar with pectin

  1. Walt,

    Nice video to show this neat little trick. To make things easier they do make a pre-mixed liquid fruit pectin so you do not have to mix the powder with the water. I use Ball Easy Gel Liquid Fruit Pectin for all my cigar repairs. This trick can save a pretty damaged cigar like when the lid of my desktop humi slammed down on the cap of a really good cigar, the pectin held it all together and the smoke was fairly flawless.

  2. Nice educational vid Walt, it shows your diversity.

    Last year I was gifted a few Cubans from a co-worker returning from El Salvador. Two of them had torn / cracked wrappers at and near the foot. Didn’t know what I was going to do with them; now I do.
    Thanx.

  3. This is a great episode of tips and tricks. I’ll probably put some of this in my travel humidor/smoking kit. It would be great for those times when a cigar gets damaged while in transit, vacation, etc.

  4. Tom –
    Is this still Ed’s shop address?

    1008 58th Street North
    St. Petersburg, FL 33710

    I e-mailed him yesterday for an address confirmation w/ no response and noticed he’s not open Sundays.
    I wanted to get payment in the mail tomorrow.

  5. Paul-Yup that’s the address I have. He probably got side tracked yesterday. I was up there smoking a smoke with him for the last few hours he was open.

  6. Cool video, seems like a very handy idea.

    But why Pectin? Is that what they use when wrapping cigars or something? Will it burn funny at all?

  7. Walt –

    Good vid; I agree with Mike and the liquid pectin suggestion. I get it in my local grocery store for something like $3 for enough to last about 86 years. Comes in two pouches – something like 1.5 oz. or 3 oz. per pouch. I pour a little bit into a tiny little vial that I have that is perfect for portability. The rest is in an air-tight container in the fridge.

    The little vial I have is very small – for lack of a better example, it holds only about 4 tears, if you were to cry into it (lol). That amount has lasted me several months so far, because you only need a tiny amount when you are making a repair.

  8. I have done this many times i usually use the cap i cut to fix a tear or whatnot but when that is not available i will cut about a 1/4 inch of the bottom of one and use that wrapper to fix it and it always works great. I never notice any taste from it and it never effects the burn. what i do is empty the packet into a class container with a nice lid than i shake it up and take off the cap there is enough pectin in there to do the job. I just dip my finger in it and and fixin always works fine.

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